Custom Search

Thursday, October 29, 2009

His Most Famous Painting (The Curtain, Jug and Compotier) - Paul Cezanne

Thursday, October 29, 2009

By Annette Labedzki

"Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier (The Curtain, Jug and Compotier)" is one of the most beautiful creations by French artist Paul Cezanne. A classic example of the 'Still Life' painting, this one was created during 1893-94. It's been claimed that this painting was instrumental in revolutionizing art and carved the way for a new 'Still Life Realist' style during twentieth century, just like Picasso's 'Cubism.' It's said that this style bridged the gap between the late nineteenth century 'Impressionism' and the early twentieth century 'Cubism.' This 23.5" x 28.75" masterpiece is a creative splendor with its display of colors and shapes proving Cezanne's excellence and his control over design & composition.

The body of the painting shows 'Still Life' with the three key objects of the title, The Curtain, Jug, and Compotier. "Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier" depicts these simple everyday objects in a decorative manner, while giving it a 'Realistic' perspective all along. The special feature of the painting is its unique brushstrokes and harmonious color schemes. At the first glance, the colors look inspired by those of Mother Nature, when they actually are blended with Paul's creative dash of hued fantasies. This painting corroborates the artist's subtle observation skill and his sensuous taste of color blending.

Ambroise Vollard, a dealer from Paris, possessed the painting initially. Later, it cruised through Cornelis Hoogendijk, Paul Rosenberg, Dr Albert C. Barnes, and the Carroll Carstairs Gallery. "Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier" then was sold at a record price, during the auction of Whitney family collection. It further stayed with many other art lovers. This priceless piece was eventually sold as the most expensive painting at Sotheby's, one of the oldest auction houses in New York, on May 10, 1999, for $60,502,500.

Paul Cezanne's keen observations combined with his inspiration from nature, led to the generation of fantastic artworks. Throughout his life, he remained a devoted Roman Catholic. In his own words, "When I judge art, I take my painting and put it next to a God-made object like a tree or flower. If it clashes, it is not art."

Even after several years of his death, Paul Cezanne is honored as a tremendous milestone in the world of creativity, and he continues to rule every art lover's heart. He is still alive in the form of his precious painting, "Rideau, Cruchon et Compotier," a definite bright star in the sky of 'Modern Painting.'

Monday, October 26, 2009

His Most Famous Painting (Madame Pompadour - Portrait of Beatrice Hastings) - Amedeo Modigliani

Monday, October 26, 2009

By Annette Labedzki

Amedeo Clemente Modigliani was one of the most unique and innovative Italian artists, who always rendered an idiosyncratic and distinctive painting style. Controversies however, surrounded his destitute life and was therefore, never famous among his contemporaries. Modigliani adopted the 'Expressionist' style of painting, where the depiction of emotions was primary. The painter blended this emotional high with twisted reality for a distinct expression in his portraits, including his masterpiece "Madame Pompadour - Portrait of Beatrice Hastings."

Modigliani was a very handsome and attractive man, well capable of luring women easily. In 1914, he met a very eccentric English poet, Beatrice Hastings, who later became his mistress. During this time, Modigliani lived a very Bohemian lifestyle, heavily addicted to drugs & alcohol. Beatrice Hastings even quoted, "A complex character. A swine and a pearl. Met him in 1914 at a crémerie. I sat opposite him. Hashish and brandy. Not at all impressed. Didn't know who he was. He looked ugly, ferocious and greedy. Met him again at the Café Rotonde. He was shaved and charming. Raised his cap with a pretty gesture, blushed and asked me to come and see his work. And I went. He always had a book in his pocket. Lau Tremont's Maldoror. The first oil painting was of Kisling. He had no respect for anyone except Picasso and Max Jacob. Detested Cocteau. Never completed anything good under the influence of hashish."

Beatrice Hastings was a very pompous and haughty woman, who was an unfortunate victim of Amedeo's drunken rage. She was the model for many of his paintings, which eventually resulted in a famous fourteen portraits series, in 1915, entitled "Madame Pompadour - Portrait of Beatrice Hastings," of which only three were exhibited. Beatrice Hastings was a very proud writer, literary critic, and a vocal feminist. Her nature at times was a complete contrast to that of Modigliani's. Due to her haughtiness, he nicknamed her Madame or madam Pompadour and created her portraits. The portraits were famous for their ability to portray the existing close relationship between Modigliani and Beatrice. Modigliani always gave key attention to the facial features of the subjects. Since he also adopted the style of 'Cubism,' his portraits were sharp and projected in manner.

Due to Beatrice's nature, Amedeo depicted her as an aristocratic 'English Madame.' The portrait, through its title subtlety, depicted the relationship between King Louis V & his mistress, which ironically manifested his relationship with Beatrice Hastings. Amedeo and Hastings' relationship lasted for two years, which died an unfortunate death, due to their contrasting attitudes.

In the "Madame Pompadour - Portrait of Beatrice Hastings," Modigliani rendered 'Cubism' by simultaneously depicting the sides of the face through different viewpoints, as well as having a collage effect with the writings on stonewall. The 'Expressionist' style was evident through the distortion of the face and the depiction of Modigliani's personal interpretation of Beatrice Hastings. The misspelled graffiti written on the painting as well as its backdrop of a stonewall reflect the deviation from reality.

Modigliani died on January 24, 1920, at the young age of 35, due to tuberculosis and overdose of drugs and alcohol. His artistic innovations and idiosyncrasies will always be fondly remembered among art lovers. His "Madame Pompadour - Portrait of Beatrice Hastings" will stand as a testament of his talent and an innovation in art.

Friday, October 23, 2009

His Most Famous Painting (Violin and Candlestick) - Georges Braque

Friday, October 23, 2009

By Annette Labedzki

Georges Braque was an eminent twentieth century French painter and sculptor, who was also the co-founder of 'Cubism.' Born on May 13, 1882, in Argenteuil-sur-Seine, from 1897 to 1899, he learned painting at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts at Le Havre, the city where he grew up. He commenced his artistic journey, experimenting in styles, such as 'Impressionism' and 'Fauvism,' before he developed 'Cubism' along with Pablo Picasso in 1908. Cezanne's artistry of 'multiple perspectives,' exhibited at Salon d'Automne, in 1907, inspired the duo towards 'Cubism.' French art critic Louis Vauxcelles saw a painting by Braque in 1908 and called it 'Cubism,' or 'bizarre cubiques.' He perceived the artwork as 'full of little cubes.' This led to the christening of the Picasso's and Georges' invention as 'Cubism,' which the duo was not initially excited about. Braque's magnum opus "Violin and Candlestick," painted in spring 1910, exemplifies the vibrant persona of the 'Cubist' style of painting.

Mostly monochromatic in style and themed on 'Still Life,' Braque's' 'Cubist' works mostly stunned the art community. This 24" x 19 3/4" (61cm x 50cm), oil on canvass, "Violin and Candlestick" is a result of the amalgamated slices of music and violin sheets rearranged at atypical angles to create a single intertwined image, with the shifting surface of forms, planes, arcs, and colors. The painting whilst illustrating three-dimensional view of the subjects on a flat canvas, shuns the traditional 'Renaissance' perspective. This actually is 'Cubism,' which focuses on representing the subjects, as viewed from several angles.

"Violin and Candlestick" was an outcome of Georges' obsession for form and stability, fuelled with a desire to create an illusion in a viewer's mind to move around freely within the painting. To achieve this, the painter conglomerated the subjects at the centre of a grid like armature & covered the boundaries of the black-outlined objects using earth-toned colors. Thereby, he managed to transform the volumes of static to hold compound surfaces on a flat plane, enabling onlookers to appreciate more of form compared to any other angle. Recognizing and understanding the effects of light astutely to elicit the appropriate emotions and effects of the subjects also served as a vital parameter for Braque's "Violin and Candlestick." He expressed this art of fragmentation as "a technique for getting closer to the object."

Georges Braque breathed his last on August 31, 1963, in Paris. His masterpiece, "Violin and Candlestick" is exhibited at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

His Most Famous Painting (The Sunblind) - Juan Gris

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

By Annette Labedzki

Juan Gris, originally Jose Victoriano Gonzalez-Perez (March 23, 1887 - May 11, 1927), was a Spanish sculptor and painter, who operated from France for the most of his life. Gris was a student of Mechanical Drawing (1902-1904) at the Escuela de Artes y Manufacturas, Madrid. During this period, he drew humorous illustrations for local journals. During 1904-1905, he learnt painting from José Maria Carbonero, an 'Academic' artist. While he continued to paint for local periodicals, it was only in 1910 that he started taking his painting seriously, and had developed his own unique style of 'Synthetic Cubism' by 1912. Two of his works in this period include 'Guitar and Flowers' (1912) and the 'Portrait of Picasso' (1912), while "The Sunblind" marked 1914.

Though Gris was associated with Pablo Picasso and the other artists following 'Cubism,' his creations were however, distinct from the other Cubist artists. Strict geometric patterns characterized most of Juan's works. He also used paper collage in his works, as evident in his "The Sunblind." Exacting and explicit are the words that can come close to describing Gris' artworks. In contrast to Picasso's and Braque's 'Cubist' works, which were monochromatic, the use of vivid colors, done in a harmonious tone, characterized Gris' style. One of his most famous works is "The Sunblind" (1914), a 'Synthetic Cubist' gouache, collage, chalk, and charcoal on canvas work, measuring 92.1 cm x 72.7 cm. Juan Gris used crayons generously to create this piece of art.

The beginning of 'Synthetic Cubism' is marked by the usage of collage or 'papier colle,' along with other materials, on a multicolored surface. In this style of creative art, the canvas surface is treated as opaque, which is accentuated by other materials applied to make the imagery stand out from the surface. "The Sunblind" is a beautiful piece of art depicting light slipping through a venetian blind. The creation also shows the shadow of a wine glass being cast on the table lying nearby. This beautiful collage depicts painted blinds along with a real newspaper. The newspaper named Le Socialiste des Pyrénées-Orientales was a local newspaper from Collioure, a place where Gris stayed in 1914. The depiction of the newspaper may possibly be reflective of his political preferences.

Juan Gris created only one sculpture in his life, which was a painted plaster named 'Harlequin,' in 1917. During 1917 to 1920, Gris played with objects and shadows in his work and used complex textures and bright colors in his paintings, which included 'the Fruit Bowl on Checkered Cloth' (1917). His works therefore became more and more complicated. His paintings showed that Juan was more interested in maintaining 'Realism' in his 'Cubist' art works, more than both, Picasso and Braque did. The Spanish painter died in 1927, in Boulogne-sur-Seine (Paris), when he was just forty years of age, but not before creating a niche for himself in the 'Cubist' genre and creating a masterpiece like "The Sunblind." "The Sunblind" is presently displayed at Tate Gallery, London.

Saturday, October 17, 2009

His Most Famous Painting (Les Demoiselles D' Avignon) - Pablo Picasso

Saturday, October 17, 2009

By Annette Labedzki

Spanish painter, draughtsman, and sculptor, Pablo Picasso, was one of the most recognized artists of the twentieth century. He always challenged the preconceived notions of art and revolutionized creativity with innovation and change. Regarded as the pioneer of 'Cubism' (where a particular subject was painted by looking at it through multiple viewpoints), Pablo Picasso is best known for his iconic painting, "Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)," created in 1907.

This masterpiece was a monumental breakthrough in 'Modern Art,' as it challenged the conventional techniques and portrayals of European art. In "Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)," Picasso boldly portrayed five female nude prostitutes of a street called Avignon, in Barcelona. Picasso did not use traditional art techniques to describe the feminine beauty; rather it was shown dipped in 'Primitivism,' with the angular dimensions of figures, attaching a definite degree of mystery to them.

It is believed that Picasso took a lot of time to create this 96" x 92" oil on canvass masterpiece. Initially, he wanted to depict a regular brothel scene with female prostitutes, a sailor, and a medical student. Later however, Pablo's ideas shifted to 'Cubism' and he created the splendor, "Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)," where the prostitutes looked directly into the eyes of the viewer, displaying a part of their sexual anxiety, which in turn would become disturbing to the spectator.

Reflecting a distinct Negro effect, two women in "Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)," bore African Masks, which apparently hinted at the African savagery and violence. Picasso was inspired to use the 'African' influence in his work, when he saw the African and Oceanic collection in the Musée d'Ethnographie du Trocadéro in Paris. These masks promoted a sense of mystery in the painting, as the viewer is left contemplating the emotions behind those faces in African masks. There were also strong influences of 'Iberian' sculpture, in which, quite similar to 'Cubism,' the subject was not rendered in a two-dimensional plane instead; it was simultaneously portrayed from multiple perspectives.

During the creation of "Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)," Cezanne's work, Bathers, depicting female nudes, deeply influenced Picasso. The artist however, put forward his original style and depicted the women in angular curves, with their hips, waists, and breasts, all being portrayed in geometrical contours. Picasso, unlike Cezanne, employed minimalist color scheme, with figures in white and just a blue curtain placed between them. Picasso also portrayed 'Still Life,' as the (fruits grapes, apples, melons, and pear) at the bottom of the painting, the grapes, apples, melons, and pear.

"Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (The Young Ladies of Avignon)," is presently exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City. Through this painting, Picasso wanted to rebel against the traditional ideas of painting, including the standard portrayal of female beauty, promoting 'Cubism' as a potential medium of art.

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Dali Paintings - Salvador Dali's Surrealist Art & Famous Paintings

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Dali paintings are covered in full here with an article aiming to detail three of his most famous paintings; including a good amount of detail on what each symbolize, and how they fit into Dali's overall art career which consisted of a whole plethora of innovation and quality in many different media, over many years.

Dali was born in Spain, 1904, and counted Cubism, Dada & Surrealism as his main art movements in a career that spanned his whole life up until his death in 1989. The Persistence of Memory, often called Melting Clocks, is the most famous painting by artist Salvador Dali.

Soft Construction with Boiled Beans was created by Dali in 1936, and is one of his best known Surrealist paintings. It was one of Dali's most political paintings, in this case attacking the subject of the Spanish civil war. Spanish artists regularly spoke out about the war at that time, and many had to leave the country temporarily in order to continue their campaign. The Soft Construction with Boiled Beans painting is now stored at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Leda Atomica is a 1949 Salvador Dali painting which shows Leda, a mythical queen, as the main subject. Leda is actually a portrait of Salvador Dali's wife, Gala, who's sat down in the painting. It is now to be found in the Dali Theatre and Museum in Figueres.

Western Art - Famous Western Artists & Paintings
Famous artists in the context of this article will be taken from those most popular. Famous or best artists is something too hard for a mere mortal like me to quantify simply whereas popularity, particularly on the internet can be calculated. The artists are not listed in any particular order, so the final entry would not necessarily be the least famous artist, it is more a general collection to browse through.

Michelangelo was an Italian Renaissance painter. Michelangelo's most famous paintings include The Torment of Saint Anthony, Manchester Madonna, Doni Tondo, The Entombment, Battle of Cascina, Leda and the Swan, The Last Judgment, The Martyrdom of St Peter & The Conversion of Saul (1542-50) Leonardo Da Vinci was an Italian genius best known as a painter, sculptor and architect, though he performed well in a wide variety of disciplines. Da Vinci most famous paintings include The Adoration of the Magi, Salai as John the Baptist & Annunciation.

Gustav Klimt was an Austrian painter and a key member of the Vienna Art Nouveau art scene aswell as a famous Symbolist artist. Klimt produced paintings of the highest order, which he is best known for, plus wall murals and other art mediums. Klimt most famous paintings include The Kiss, Judith & Danaë.

Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch artist from the Impressionist era and well known for his connections to Paul Gauguin and his art collector brother, Theo. He was a pioneer of Expressionism with enormous influence on 20th century art, especially on the Fauves and German Expressionists. Van Gogh most famous paintings include Sunflowers, Starry Night, Potato Eaters & Van Gogh Self-portraits.

Claude Monet was a founder and key member of French impressionist painting and also one of the most famous landscape artists of all time, alongside the likes of Van Gogh, Turner & Constable. Impressionism is taken from the name of his painting Impression Sunrise. Claude Monet most famous paintings include Water Lilies, Japanese Bridge & Camille Monet Portraits.
Pablo Picasso was a Spanish Cubist painter and one of the most recognized figures in 20th-century art, he is best known for co-founding the Cubist movement and for the wide variety of styles embodied in his work. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907) and Guernica (1937), his depiction of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.

David Hockney is an English painter, draughtsman, printmaker, stage designer and photographer, based in Yorkshire, United Kingdom, although he also maintains a prominence in London. An important contributor to the Pop art movement of the 1960s, he is considered one of the most influential British artists of the twentieth century. David Hockney most famous paintings include Los Angeles Pool, Garrowby Hill & Malibu.



Sunday, October 11, 2009

Western Art - Famous Western Artists & Paintings

Sunday, October 11, 2009

Famous artists in the context of this article will be taken from those most popular. Famous or best artists is something too hard for a mere mortal like me to quantify simply whereas popularity, particularly on the internet can be calculated. The artists are not listed in any particular order, so the final entry would not necessarily be the least famous artist, it is more a general collection to browse through.

Michelangelo was an Italian Renaissance painter. Michelangelo's most famous paintings include The Torment of Saint Anthony, Manchester Madonna, Doni Tondo, The Entombment, Battle of Cascina, Leda and the Swan, The Last Judgment, The Martyrdom of St Peter & The Conversion of Saul (1542-50) Leonardo Da Vinci was an Italian genius best known as a painter, sculptor and architect, though he performed well in a wide variety of disciplines. Da Vinci most famous paintings include The Adoration of the Magi, Salai as John the Baptist & Annunciation.

Gustav Klimt was an Austrian painter and a key member of the Vienna Art Nouveau art scene aswell as a famous Symbolist artist. Klimt produced paintings of the highest order, which he is best known for, plus wall murals and other art mediums. Klimt most famous paintings include The Kiss, Judith & Danaë.

Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch artist from the Impressionist era and well known for his connections to Paul Gauguin and his art collector brother, Theo. He was a pioneer of Expressionism with enormous influence on 20th century art, especially on the Fauves and German Expressionists. Van Gogh most famous paintings include Sunflowers, Starry Night, Potato Eaters & Van Gogh Self-portraits.

Claude Monet was a founder and key member of French impressionist painting and also one of the most famous landscape artists of all time, alongside the likes of Van Gogh, Turner & Constable. Impressionism is taken from the name of his painting Impression Sunrise. Claude Monet most famous paintings include Water Lilies, Japanese Bridge & Camille Monet Portraits.
Pablo Picasso was a Spanish Cubist painter and one of the most recognized figures in 20th-century art, he is best known for co-founding the Cubist movement and for the wide variety of styles embodied in his work. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907) and Guernica (1937), his depiction of the German bombing of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War.

David Hockney is an English painter, draughtsman, printmaker, stage designer and photographer, based in Yorkshire, United Kingdom, although he also maintains a prominence in London. An important contributor to the Pop art movement of the 1960s, he is considered one of the most influential British artists of the twentieth century. David Hockney most famous paintings include Los Angeles Pool, Garrowby Hill & Malibu.

This initial article is the first part of a series of different articles covering major artists from the west. For further artists please return back for future articles here.

French Art - Famous French Artists & Paintings
French art has played a crucial role in many art movements, both past and present. It is perhaps best known for its influence in impressionism and the importance of the French capital, Paris, to the art world. Paris' Louvre Museum has retained its status as one of the premier spots for art appreciation in the world and even houses The Mona Lisa, one of the world's most famous paintings.

The key periods of French art include Prehistoric, Medieval, Renaissance & Mannerism, Baroque & Classicism, Rococo & Neoclassicism, 19th & 20th Century Contemporary movements.
The Merovingian period of the fifth century began a change in French art which was to continue up to the present day, with new movements being created all the time.

Merovingian's catalyst for art development was continued on with Carolingian art over a 120-year period from 750 to 900. After Carolingian rule closed around 900, there was little more development or production of significant French art movements for some 60 years. France became a divided country at this point and there were not the right conditions for artistic creativity. The 10th and 11th centuries were dominated by local monastries who took a significant role in France's art production at that stage.

The name refers to the influence of, and return to, Roman styles and principles in architecture and art which this movement used. Gothic art and architecture then took over French are for around 300 years. Whilst originating here, it actually spread quickly to other parts of Europe. Gothic art included sculpture, panel painting, stained glass, fresco, and illuminated manuscript most prominently.

The French invasion of Italy in the late 15th century allowed the influence of the Renaissance to fully take hold of France's art direction and leave a mark which remains strong even today.

The French Revolution and the Napoleonic wars brought in new influences which helped to push Renaissance art into new directions and bridge the gap between Renaissance art and the later styles of Romanticism and later Impressionism.

Romanticism brought French landscape painting to the forefront and later led to Gustave Courbet and the Barbizon school as key markers in the further changes to the status quo. The late 19th century brought French Symbolism from Gustave Moreau, the professor of Matisse and Rouault, as well as Odilon Redon.

Impressionism brought an array of French art to the forefront, led by Claude Monet and his use of landscapes and carefully prepared gardens to develop artistic coverage of light changes and vivid paintings. For contemporary art, Impressionism, Cubism, Dada, Expressionism & Surrealism have roots in French art.



Thursday, October 8, 2009

The History of American Painters

Thursday, October 8, 2009

Painting is one of the most interesting forms of art. It depicts life in vivid colors and speaks so much about oneself, the painter’s aspirations, his surroundings, and his nation. Below are some of the highlights in America’s painting history. Let’s take a look at how painting developed in America and some of the best American painters who in one way or another marked a lasting imprint in the history of American art.

The puritan values of early English settlers in North America were so severe that they shunned all sorts of luxury including artistic expressions such as painting, a flourishing art in Europe especially in England. Training in an art school was contrary to their strict Puritan way of life.

Growth of American Art
Apparently, early Americans’ interest in painting grew bigger that several years later after having established their life in America, American painters began to go to England to study.
Although early American painters were highly influenced by artistic styles already developed in Europe, as years passed by they began to create their own style in painting. This distinctive American style was not only shown by American painters but as well as other American artists, especially in the field of architecture.

Diversity in painting styles of American painters was also promoted by the country’s big geographical size. American painters from each region showed variations in their works. Moreover, there were differences in the works of American painters living in the cities and those of American painters living in rural areas.

National Academy of Design
The National Academy of Design, formed in 1825, was an honorary association of American artists, including American painters.

Society of American Artists
First members of the Society of American Artists include American painters Robert Swain Gifford, an American landscape painter; John Henry Twachtman, most popular impressionist landscape painter in his time; John LaFarge who was also famous for his stained glass windows and writings; and Albert Pinkham Ryder, famous for his seascapes. These American painters left the National Academy of Design and formed their own association because the first failed to meet their needs as artists.

Ten American Painters
Due to the Society of American Artists’ rising commercialism, ten significant American painters resigned from the association and were know as the “Ten American Painters.” Among them were John Henry Twachtman, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Edmund Charles Tarbell, and Frank Weston Benson. The group was identified as impressionists.

Famous Paintings - The Arts, the Painters, and the Controversies
In 2005, the Today Program of Radio 4 and National Gallery summer scheme were in the search of Britain's greatest painting. Controversy loomed around this scheme, which was seen as a great way of celebrating art. Artist Jack Vettriano, whose paintings adorned numerous greeting cards, was not in the top 10 list. An arts work by Rembrandt, voted for the most popular painting, was unable to find a spot in the top 10. A panel of three, including a critic, an artist, and a BBC Governor, decided the fate of these paintings in the list. The famous painters, Francis Bacon, Pablo Picasso, and Lucian Freud were not given their due artwork credit. The work of David Hockney's Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy (1970-71) was the only painting of the 20th century to be enlisted. The oldest painting in the list was Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck, which dates back to 1434. The painter of "The Marx Brothers" (1980), Andy Warhol, was amidst arts controversy quite recently. Warhol became rich and famous when his painting, "Ten Portraits" was exhibited in the Jewish Museum. Warhol accumulated a lot of money through painting portraits. The crème of the celebrity society of approximately 1,600 people were willing to pay him for a portrait. Artist Andy Warhol's 'The Marx Brothers' (1980) made a re-entry in the Jewish Museum on March 16 as 'Warhol's Jews: Ten Portraits Reconsidered'. Other portraits that appeared in the exhibition were the works of artists Albert Einstein, Franz Kafka, George Gershwin, Gertrude Stein, Golda Meir, Louis Brandeis, Martin Buber, the Marx Brothers, Sarah Bernhardt, and Sigmund Freud.

Another latest controversy troubling the arts is the work of Adam Cullen in Australia's top prize for religious art. The controversial painting has the line "only women bleed," engraved on the Cross with Christ. The line is inspired from an Alice Cooper song. One of the Blake Prize judges had quit the panel, strongly condemning this painting. Painters are relying on religious images to obtain a top position in the list. Another controversial religious image was that of Melbourne party boy, Corey Worthington as Jesus. The Prime Minister John Howard and the Archbishop of Sidney were aghast over the artworks.

Sometimes I wonder if artists create paintings out of an inherent need to express themselves or do they create paintings to shock and stir up controversy.


Monday, October 5, 2009

His Most Famous Painting (The Ambassadors) - Hans Holbein

Monday, October 5, 2009

Hans Holbein (1497-1543), also known as Hans Holbein the Younger, was a German 'Northern Renaissance' painter, drafter, designer, and the printmaker of sixteenth century. Hans, the creator of "The Ambassadors," was married to Elsbeth Binsenstock, the widow of a tanner. He spent most of his life in England.

Hans Holbein manifested the influence of Early Netherlandish painters in his paintings. He portrayed many religious pictures. When Holbein was in England in 1533, he procured an opportunity from the French Ambassador Jean de Dinteville (1503- 1555) to paint an extensive, glorious, & magnificent panel work, also his most famous painting, called "The Ambassadors."

"The Ambassadors" (1533) is currently present in the National Gallery, London. It is an oil and tempera work on oak, measuring 207 cm x 209.5 cm. "The Ambassadors" is an excellent example of 'Anamorphosis' (an atrociously deformed representation of a picture, painted on either a plane or a curved surface).

Holbein's most famous painting "The Ambassadors" is a double portrait displaying two ambassadors Jean de Dinteville (left) and Georges de Selve (right), standing on the either side of a two shelf table situated centrally to them. Jean is in secular clothing, while Georges is wearing a clerical dress. The upper surface of the table is covered with an 'Oriental' carpet. The exact interpretation of this 'Still Life' in the painting has always been controversial. In fact, Holbein would mostly 'Symbolically' use 'Still Life' to depict the prominent advancements of the respective time.

Hans' most famous painting "The Ambassador" portrays the following 'astronomical' objects on the upper shelf of the table:
• Torquetum, which an ancient Greek scientist, Ptolemy, discovered.
• On the left side of the Torquetum, a celestial globe is present.
• In between the globe and the Torquetum, a polyhedral sundial is painted.

On the lower shelf, Holbein painted the following objects:
• An open Lutheran Hymnbook - The two pages disclosed in the painting are not the subsequent pages of the book.
• Lute and the cases of flutes exhibits music as a specialty of that era
• A terrestrial globe is painted on the extreme left side. The map on the globe illustrates New World.
• A red colored arithmetic book, which describes the importance of mathematics in a merchant's lifetime (Georges de Selve belonged to a merchant family).

The most striking segment of the painting is a skull painted on the floor, marking the 'anamorphosis' angle of the painting. Critics and scholars largely believe that Hans Holbein, through "The Ambassadors," tried showing that beyond all science, art, religion, politics, knowledge, and life is the ultimate and inevitable death, represented by the skull.

His Most Famous Painting - Country Outing Or Party of Friends - Fernand Leger
French 'Tubist,' 'Cubist,' and 'Modernist' painter, sculptor, and filmmaker Fernand Leger (February 4, 1881 - August 17, 1955) was primarily influenced by 'Impressionism.' Leger's meeting with Paul Cezanne and his exposure to the 'Cubism' of Pablo Picasso & Georges Braque, greatly influenced the evolution of Fernand's personal style of painting, as is evident in his most famous painting "Country Outing (La Partie de Champagne (Party of Friends))."

By around 1910, Fernand Leger's paintings had developed 'Abstract' and 'Contemporary' flavors. Leger painted "Country Outing (La Partie de Champagne)" towards the end of his career, in 1954, at Paris. The painting is based on the theme of holidays and relaxation. His most famous painting "Country Outing" depicted what he witnessed every weekend, such as:
• Families going to the countryside on weekends to meet their friends and families
• Families enjoying a day out sluggishly
• The cyclists
• The campers
• The accordionist
• The lovers
• Party of friends

"Country Outing (La Partie de Champagne)" is a fine hand painted lithograph. Lithography is an art of producing painting on a flat base with a greasy or oily substance, oil paints here. Leger's most famous painting shows a feeling of calmness and pleasure, reflecting the dissolution of sad impact of the two World Wars on him. "Country Outing" series was created after nine years of World War II. In "La Partie de Champagne (Party of Friends)," Leger separated designs from colors, creating a visual imbalance in his work. "Country Outing" describes flat areas in audacious color and mechanical figures, surrounded by thick black lines. The painting provides an extensive view of the landscapes covered. Fernand's most famous painting consists of many figures, represented in a linear fashion. The figures' shape and pattern were Leger's main concern. Leger beautifully portrayed the working class couples, with their hands on each other's shoulders, showing honest and incorruptible feelings of humanity, the artist always aspired for. The shapes and the patterns of the figures in "Country Outing (La Partie de Champagne (Party of Friends))" blended with the natural surroundings. Undoubtedly, this masterpiece by Fernand Leger fantastically became an integral part of the 'Contemporary Landscape Painting.'



Friday, October 2, 2009

Famous Paintings

Friday, October 2, 2009

Even if you have little interest in art, you have probably heard names such as Leonardo da Vinci, Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt van Rijn, Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso. Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper is the most famous of his 30-odd pieces of work, apart from the Mona Lisa. The painting is a massive 15x29 feet, and it covers an entire wall in the dining hall of the Santa Maria della Grazie convent in Milan, Italy. A procrastinator who left many of his works unfinished, Leonardo had no choice but to finish this painting, as it was commissioned to him by the man who had been paying his wages for 18 years – the Duke of Milan, Ludovico Sforza.

Vincent Van Gogh was considered by some to be the greatest painter in European history. His produced his most enigmatic painting, titled The Starry Night, during his stay at a psychiatric center in France, where he was recovering from mental problems. His other well-known painting is of a bunch of sunflowers, which he painted when he moved to Arles, where he hoped to found an art colony. None of his work was ever appreciated during his lifetime; in fact, he lived a life of utter poverty, hopelessness and despair, and eventually took his life when he could not bear the suffering anymore.

Of all the maestros, the famed Spanish painter is one of the most popular of the 20th century. It captured the brutality, inhumanity and utter hopelessness of war, in his typical cubist style. There is still Rembrandt and his The Raising of Lazarus to consider, and Monet and his famous nature paintings, and Raphael.

List of Most Famous Paintings
Painting has been a hobby as well as vocation since very old times. This art evolved to great levels since the inception. Many techniques and styles assimilated into this art making it more lovable to masses. Painters experimented with different themes, styles, textures, media but few of the experiments were accepted by the art lovers. Though all the works which these painters made were exceptional in look, technique and accuracy but there are only a few works that have touched the hearts of the masses and left an indelible impact on the art lovers. These works have been liked by the people of all periods and are immensely famous.

Great works are thousands but greatest are few. Greatest works are revered by the masses as well as the exponents of art. Monalisa is an immortal art work made by Leonardo da Vinci. Monalisa has intrigued millions with her captivating smile. The Melting Watches of Salvador Dali is another hugely famous art work. Some of the most famous paintings have been made by great painters of all times.

Here list is given of famous paintings:
• Ajanta Murals (Made by the painters under Vakataka Kings in India)
• The Starry Night (Van Gogh)
• The Last Supper and Monalisa (Leonardo da Vinci)
• Madonna and Child
• The Last Judgment (Michelangelo)
• Impression, Sunrise (Monet)
• The Old Guitarist (Picasso)
• The Persistence of Memory (Dali)



Related Posts with Thumbnails